I have to breach confidentiality – part 2

Disclosures requiring that confidentiality be breached are rare. A little preparation should permit you to focus upon supporting your client through the process, preserving your therapeutic rapport.

In part one, we considered how to react when a breach of confidentiality seems necessary, how to prepare for such an eventuality and what to say to the client.

Now we will consider how to continue your involvement with your client once you have had to breach their confidentiality. We will also consider how to proceed when your decision to breach confidentiality is reached outwith the session, whether independently, directed by your supervisor or required by law (eg: by a court order).

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Aim for reliability before availability

Reliability is more important than availability in the long run. Clients who know when you are not available can make informed choices regarding alternative sources of support.

I once worked with a client who rang her GPs so frequently and insistently that they established a rota for taking her calls. She bombarded every new therapist with telephone calls. I told her she could call me between 1030 and 1130 on Monday or Thursday and that if I was on another call, I’d call her as soon as I finished. She rang me twice the first week and two more times in the next six months. She also called her GPs and CPN less frequently.

Many therapists feel a duty to respond to client’s crises. Who better to address a difficult situation: the therapist who has listened carefully to the client’s life-story or the harassed junior medic who has never met them before? Shouldn’t you always be available for your client?

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Always ask when you don’t understand

Asking when you don’t understand benefits you and your clients. Pretending to understand can discourage disclosure and support poor decision making.

When I began working with people with learning disabilities, I was told “don’t pretend that you’ve understood what someone says to you”. This seemed fairly obvious advice until I was in the embarrassing situation of having to say “I’m sorry: I didn’t catch that” for the third time in five minutes.

Whether faced with a speech impediment or bombarded with abbreviations & unknown references, it is tempting to nod in agreement and try to move on. In either case, the principle is the same: by attempting to avoid embarrassment now, you’re preparing the ground for future, potentially much more serious, problems.

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