DoctorQ on PocketDoctor.co.uk

A useful list of questions to ask your family doctor. These questions cover most eventualities in family medicine, but are also useful pointers to the information other therapists should be able to provide their clients.

The average GP consultation leaves little time for questions. 5-10 minutes is the norm, most of which will be spent on information gathering and diagnosis.

Patients may have questions which they are reluctant to ask their GP. They may have decided not to take up more than their fair share of the GP’s time. They may have thought of their question a few hours or days after the appointment. In either case, they may hesitate to bother a busy GP again with the same matter.

Phil Hammond, a former GP who writes for the satirical magazine Private Eye and has presented a number of popular medical TV programmes, has written a list of helpful questions covering many of the situations which might occur in a medical consultation.

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How to Win Friends & Influence People

A seventy year old sales manual is not an obvious first choice for a therapist’s bookshelf, but this is no ordinary sales manual. How to Win Friends & Influence People offers ways to make people like you, win people to your way of thinking & change people without giving offence or arousing resentment, achievements as useful to therapists and our clients as to salespeople.

Written in 1936 by Dale Carnegie, a public speaking coach, the book summarises twenty years of training courses and advice for salespeople and their managers. The language of the book is very much of its time, as are the examples Carnegie uses to illustrate his points (you will learn more about US presidents and 1930’s gangsters than you ever wanted to know!), but the core messages are timeless.

Carnegie argues that successful outcomes arise from positive relationships, much as Carl Rogers (father of counselling) believed that unconditional positive regard for the client was an essential part of effective therapy.

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