Ensure that your client can say stop

Ensure that your client can tell you to stop or to go away. All but the most severely disabled clients should be able communicate these instructions and should be encouraged to do so.

Professional codes of conduct require informed consent to treatment. Clients with cognitive damage or impaired communication pose a major problem for therapists and support workers. Informed consent may be beyond the capabilities of the client and may instead be granted by a relative or guardian.

When the client is obviously distressed, therapists and carers face a dilemma: should they continue with the intervention sanctioned by the guardian or should they suspend, even abandon their intervention?

Clients who lack the capacity for informed consent may still make smaller decisions relating to their care. Two important choices which can be made and communicated by all but the most disabled are a request for you to stop what you are currently doing and a request for you to end the session.

Before beginning work with a client whose communication is impaired or whose capacity is diminished, you should establish how they would convey a request for you to stop and a request for you to leave. If this is unclear or has yet to be established, either agree with the client how they would indicate such desires or consider a Clinical Psychology or Speech & Language Therapy referral.

There will be occasions on which an intervention must proceed regardless of the client’s wishes (as when the client is being treated under a Section of the Mental Health Act or similar legislation). For most therapists, these situations will be few and far between: medication may be required by a treatment order, but the same client may still have a choice as regards physiotherapy or dietetic advice.

Therapists should not assume that clients whose cognitive faculties and communication are unimpaired will be sufficiently assertive as to be able to say “stop” or “I want to leave”: many may have sought referral precisely because they lack such assertiveness.

Unassertive clients can be reassured that their telling you to “stop” or to “go away” is useful to you. No therapist wishes to force clients into discussions or actions for which they are unprepared, and some issues require a great deal of preparation. If you know your client will give you honest feedback—and your client knows they are permitted to do so—you can both relax.

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