Compensation cases and miraculous recoveries

Experience suggests that receiving compensation for physical or mental injury or distress is often followed by a significant improvement in the client’s symptoms. Many therapists decline to take on clients with ongoing compensation cases and some question the honesty of clients who make such recoveries.

Therapists who decline such cases may simply be unwilling to become embroiled in a legal battle (or fearful that a litigious client may turn on them) but those who doubt the client may be failing an empathy test. A client claiming compensation has a great deal to fear from their therapist.

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Remove the miraculous from the Miracle Question

The Miracle Question can elicit negative responses from some clients. These negative reactions can be avoided by rephrasing the question without the miraculous element.

The Miracle Question is used by Solution-Oriented Therapists to elicit the conditions which would lead the client to consider their problem solved:

Suppose that one night, while you were asleep, there was a miracle and this problem was solved. How would you know? What would be different?

The client’s answer generally contains the seeds of their own solution and can be used to set treatment goals and propose strategies. Used properly, the Miracle Question can be a powerful therapeutic technique, but it has several liabilities inherent in the phrasing of the question.

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