Transfer control of the session with codes

Unfamiliar co-therapists can use code phrases to transfer control of the session. Both they and the client can then focus on the client’s issues rather than the dynamics between the therapists.

While there should be no confusion in the mind of the client as to who is leading the session, there may be some stress for the therapists. Trainees may wonder if and when their supervisor will take over (or in some cases, may wish their supervisor to rescue them!). Supervisors may wish to ask a question or reinforce a point, but hesitate to undermine the trainee by interrupting.

The client’s focus should be on the issues they bring to therapy. Any awareness of unease on the part of their therapist may distract from this focus. Transfer of control of the session from one therapist to the other should be obvious to the client, but wrangling between the therapists should not.

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Be ready for clients’ companions

Be prepared to deal with the companions clients may bring to therapy. Dealing gracefully and helpfully with them can’t hurt your relationship with the client.

With the obvious exception of Marital Therapy and Child & Family Therapy, models of therapy tend to assume a 1:1 interaction between a therapist and a client.

In practice, most clients are accompanied, at least to their initial interview, by a parent, partner or friend (sometimes all three). Service information leaflets often neglect to advise clients whether their companion can join them in the consulting room, creating the potential for an awkward first interaction with the therapist: “can my Mum / husband / friend come in with us?”

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