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Read your clients’ information sources

Be aware of clients’ information sources in addition to your own. Newspapers, magazines and online forums vary widely in quality, but may contain information of use to you and your other clients. A client who I had advised on the control of panic attacks returned a...

Check your client can read and write

Checking that your client can read & write assists both you and them. Attempting to use questionnaires, journals or bibliotherapy with someone hiding their illiteracy could end your intervention before it has begun. Literacy isn’t essential in therapy:...

BBC Health

A source of good advice and good links to other reputable sites. BBC Health can be recommended by therapists who wish to encourage or support internet research by their clients. Searching the internet for health related topics is a risky business. A site with a...

Helpful patients are not hateful patients

Therapists should encourage and support, not dread, “helpful patients”. Internet or other research by the client can indicate active involvement in treatment. In 1978 JE Groves described four categories of “hateful” patient, ie: the patients...

Be ready for clients’ companions

Be prepared to deal with the companions clients may bring to therapy. Dealing gracefully and helpfully with them can’t hurt your relationship with the client. With the obvious exception of Marital Therapy and Child & Family Therapy, models of therapy tend...