Be on time for your clients

Be on time for your appointments & consultations. Punctuality conveys professionalism, respect and allows you to address & manage possible resistance on the part of the client.

You will upset your clients

Apparently innocuous comments can upset your clients. You can’t avoid triggering issues unknown to you, but you can be ready to respond if they are brought to light.

Prevent panic: keep your room cool

Prevent clients from panicking by keeping your room cool. Overheating clients can misinterpret a rise in room temperature as the onset of a panic attack.

I have to breach confidentiality – part 2

Disclosures requiring that confidentiality be breached are rare. A little preparation should permit you to focus upon supporting your client through the process, preserving your therapeutic rapport.

I have to breach confidentiality – part 1

Disclosures requiring that confidentiality be breached are rare. A little preparation should permit you to focus upon supporting your client through the process, preserving your therapeutic rapport.

Claim your chair with your notepad

Use your notepad to claim your chair before the client enters the room. If you can sit where you need to be, there will be no unease to be misinterpreted by the client.

Be ready for clients’ companions

Be prepared to deal with the companions clients may bring to therapy. Dealing gracefully and helpfully with them can’t hurt your relationship with the client.

My client is crying

Trainees (and clients) need to know that crying is common in therapy. Experienced therapists need to remember that crying may be common in therapy, but that crying in front of a stranger is probably a rare experience for any given client: you may now be relaxed about the situation, but they aren’t!

Hypotheticals encourage proactive supervision

Using supervision to plan ahead for common and uncommon events has advantages for therapist and client. Both gain when the therapist has considered their range of responses ahead of time.