Check you have the right client

Check you have the right person before you begin your session. There is scope for confusion in busy clinics, but mistakes can occur even in otherwise empty waiting rooms.

There was only one person in the waiting area. I said her name and she followed me into my room. After 10 minutes or so, it became clear she wasn’t my client: she was in a lot of pain and had been awaiting a GP; when I walked into the waiting room, she hadn’t listened to the name I called. She missed her actual appointment and I missed my actual client.

Outside of addiction services, therapy clients rarely have anything to gain by posing as someone else. When dealing with people who are distracted by pain, hallucinations or medication, however, there is potential for confusion.

Most therapists are accessed via reception staff. Depending upon the layout of the facility, receptionists may be able to point out your client in the waiting area (or at least confirm that your client has arrived). In a busy outpatient clinic or GP surgery, this may not be possible.

Calling a client’s name in a busy waiting room may get you someone with a similar name awaiting another therapist. Explaining your role and name dropping the referrer may be enough to alert the client that they are in the wrong session, but clients are frequently referred without adequate consultation or by locums or other staff whose names they don’t know.

First time clients may have psyched themselves up to speak to a stranger about their most intimate concerns Even if not in pain or on medication, they may not be listening for much other than their cue to reel off their story. Details such as the wrong GP or profession may pass them by.

Clients with multiple appointments or a history of referrals may be numb to the whole process. They no longer attend to therapists’ names or professions: they just follow the latest person to call their name and do what they’re told, however unusual it may seem.

Short of requesting photo ID, there’s no foolproof way to prevent identity confusion, but the potential can be minimised by requesting that the client provide a piece of personal information: “can you just tell me your correct address?” or “can you just confirm your date of birth?”. Don’t give the information in the question: “is your date of birth 29.10.64?” can be answered with a nod that proves nothing.

The aim is to request a single piece of fairly specific data, the provision of which both confirms the clients’ identity and passes control of the conversation back to you, so that the client doesn’t launch into their story before you’ve been able to explain consent or confidentiality.

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