Relaxation Techniques: A Practical Handbook

A compendium of relaxation techniques. This book supports the clinical practice of physical and psychological therapists seeking to explore the field of relaxation training or to tailor their approach to individual clients.

Practicing Therapy

A collection of exercises for developing therapists. The insights to be derived from this book should improve the practice of any therapist.

The Road to Recovery is not smooth

Continual improvement in therapy is the exception, not the rule. Stalls and deterioration may indicate a problem with the client, therapist or both, but may also be a sign of progress onto dealing with greater difficulties masked by the initial problem.

What is your one aim for any session?

Having too many goals can be as bad as having no goals. This is as true for therapists as for our clients, yet therapists may enter into a session with far too many goals to achieve in one sitting.

DoctorQ on PocketDoctor.co.uk

A useful list of questions to ask your family doctor. These questions cover most eventualities in family medicine, but are also useful pointers to the information other therapists should be able to provide their clients.

Manipulative therapists get manipulative clients

“Manipulative” clients may be reacting to overly controlling therapists. Before using such a destructive label, it is worth asking why someone would need to manipulate their therapist if they have agreed common goals.

Writing when you speak preserves eye contact

Writing only when you are speaking maintains normal eye contact. This serves to normalise the interaction, reassures the client that they have your attention and that you are writing what they are saying.